ge

Sh

ns ie Fy

= HARTFORD =

CASS. “Book. 574 42 LVWN9dr gle.2 3

»~ Me Accession NOo_\254 16 | Une

Wir Mops One

tell Ge eemeancsemenrceemen cSt, te nein clusion of the Revolutionary War there was but very little civil business done in the county at Litchfield, and Mr. Reeve betook himself to giving in- struction to young gentlemen who looked forward to the legal profession for support and advancement when quieter times should’ come. This em- ployment tended greatly to enlarge and improve his stock of legal learning, and led the way for him to begin in 1784 a systematic course of instruction in the law and to regular classes. The Law

' School dates from that year. It con- . tinued in successful operation and with

annual graduating classes until 1832. The catalogue contains the names of one thousand and fifteen young men

» who: -were prepared for the bar subse- s quent to the year 1798, most of/ whom + were admitted to the practice in the

court at Litchfield, The list of students prior to that date is imperfect, but there are known to have been at least two hundred and ten. More than two thirds of the students registered fron. states other than connecticut. Maine sent four, New Hampshire fifteen, Ver- mont twenty-seven, Massachusetts ninety-four, Rhode Island twenty-two, New York one hundred and twenty- four, New Jersey eleven, Pennsylvania thirty, Delaware eighteen, Maryland thirty-nine, Virginia twenty-one, North Carolina twenty, South Carolina forty- five, Georgia sixty-nine,. Ohio four, Indiana, Mississippi and Tennessee each one, Kentucky nine, Alabama three. and Louisiana seven, There were four from the District of Columbia and one from Calcutta. The. greatest number who entered in any single year was fifty-four in 1813.

Opposite the name of each student the catalogue mentions the officers of distinction held by him in after-years. In that particular the compilers of the catalogue have made careful inquiry, and the writer has been told by mem- bers of the bar and of the judiciary in several of the states that the infor- mation is accurate and practically com- plete. Lawyers now living in the original states will recognize the names of many men conspicuous in the jurid- ical annals of their.state. Aaron Burr studied law at Litchfield. John C. Cal- houn entered the Law School in 1805: only a few rods from the school buila- ing- was the house where Harrict

Beecher Stowe was. born in 1811, andi

Hienry Ward Beecher in 1813: and a short hour’s walk would have brought the young Southerner to the spot where John Brown was born in 1800, in the

, adjoining town of Torrington, Two of

the graduates became judges of the

Supreme ‘Court of the United States-—!

Henry Baidwin and Levi Woodbury;

ENON

wor

pees...

* f

ee RET, (al question of law and not of fact. Of course there was no American consti- tutional law when the school was founded, though some of the states hand already adopted constitutions. The first book on corporation law was that on Kyd, published in London in 1793, but it was chiefly made up of authorities and precedents relating to municipal corporations; and Willeock on Cor- porations, also an English treatise. was still more limited in its plan. There

j was no American text-book on cor-

porations until the first edition of Angell and Ames was published in 1831, At that,time the need of such a book had become very urgent, but in the early years of the Litchfield Law School there must have been extreme- ly few private business. corporations in this country. Not until. Louisville, etc., R. Co. v: Letson, 2 How. (U. S.) 497, decided in 1844, did corporations become competent to sue and be sued as “citizens” of a state, regardless of the citizenship of the corporators. A “fellow servant” was a total stranger in legal nomenclature: Priestly v. Fowler, 3 M. & W. 1. was decided in 1837; Murray v. Railroad Co., 1 Mc- Mull. (S. Car.) 385, in 1841; and Farwell v. Railroad Co., 4 Met. (Mass.) 49, in 1842. The term “contributory negii- gence” had not been coined: Butter-

cided in 1809; Davies v. Mann, 10 M. & W. 546, in 1842, and the phrase is not used in either case. Civil actions for damages for-death by wrongful act were not maintainable. The law of insur- ance was virtually. the creation <f Lord Mansfield, but the volume of in- surance law was comparatively insig- nificant for several decades. On th2 other hand, there was an abundance of real-estate law and of law concerning executors and administrators and trustees generally. In those days the executor de son tort was more in evi- dence than at present, although even now he has so much vitality in some jurisdictions that it weuld not be wise for the practitiorer to characterize him as Judge Lumpkin did in Shotwell vy. Rowell, 30 Ga. 559, “de son fiddie- stick!”? and cry, “Away with him!” The principles of equity jurisprudence had secured a firm footing, and’at this day they are admiristered in the Federal courts as they were expounded in the High Court of Chancery in Englard

(HE_HARTFORD DAILY |

beHone that it fell into disrepute; the celebrated Rules of Hilary Term were adopted in 1834, and we have since © substituted very generally for ‘the’ technicalities of the common-law _ system what we .term a piain and _ roncise statement of causes of action and of defenses, administering law and equity in one suit, and sometimes per-, adventure evolving a judgment as in-_ congruous as the one examined in Bennett v. Butterworth, 11 How. (U.+ 3.) 669, or exhibiting the chaos of plea d- ngs and proceedings tabulated by the ‘eporter in Randon y. Toby, iL Hiow. U. S.)' 493, Speaking of the reformed srocedure, how many yers ar vware that

ystem was recognized” and’ sere nended: for, adoption by the preceptor

jf Judge Reeve, founder of the Litch

leld Law School? The first volume Of 8, tcot’s Connecticut Reports Was pub-— ished in 1798. The reporter Was Jesse! toot, afterward as above stated. a udge of the Supreme Court, with whom ‘apping Reeve had studied law fartford. We will (

not the courts o

i |hancery in this state borrowed from field v. Forrester, 11 East 60, was de-. out the ignorance and barbarism of the

foreign jurisdiction, which grew

tw-judges at a certain period in that | duntry from whence borrowed? And{ ‘ould it.not be as safe for the people | » Invest the courts of law with the) ower of deciding all questions and af

lving relief in all cases according to} ie rules established in chancery, as it|

‘| to trust those same judges as chan-}

sllors to do it? Those rules might be} onsidered as a part of the law, and the ‘medy be made much more concise | id effectual. Further, would not this} medy great inconveniences and save! uch expense to suitors, who are fre-| lently turned round at law to seek | remedy in chancery, and as often | ned round in chancery because they ive an adequate remedy at law? These ‘e serious evils and ought not to be’ ‘rmitted to exist in the jurispruderesa a country famed for liberty andj stice, and which can be remedied only | ' the interposition of the ‘legislature.’ | Pe i a at

S| —~ ise Eoin aes

when the Constitution was adopted in|}’

1789. Judge Gould was a master of the common-law system of pleading. which was extolled by some of its eulogists as the perfection of human reason. Dui- ing the period of the Law School the noble science. of pleading became

burdened with so many refinements and”

TET be cca momrygresnr ema Te EEG 1S 8 0S ISL “OD ‘eaunT “g +9 |

DOT“"ST6T “3 48st "OD woTsiaoT

LITCHFIELD’S LAW SCHOOL

{nteresting Sketch of the Famous Connecticut Institution,

(Law Notes.)

In a recent issue of one of the New York ucwst.apers an advertisement an-

nouncir the number and destination of daily trains -leaving the Grand Central Station mentioned ‘‘two for

Litchfield Hills.’ . Maybe: the spirit of commercialism, lately deprecated in a striking address by one of New York's foremost citizens, has left no recolleec- tion of ‘Litchfield Hill in the minds of sothamites, except for. those of them who spend their summers in that quiet Village in northwestern Connecticut, or have heard «f its wonderful beauty and delightful environments. To-day its attractions as a summer. residence are not surpassed by those of any other town in New England. ‘More than a eentury ago the town had fame of an- other sort, which must have been known to every New York patriot, for the murmur of it. reached across the Atlantic. One who looks through the records of the town meetings of litch- field from 1765 to 1775 will find that there were discussions on the Stamp .act, the Boston Port Bill, and other acts of Parliamentary aggression, as clear and | well defined as the debates in that town meeting where Samuel Adams and Harrison Gray Otis were the principal speakers. The child Liberty would: not have been born in the Boston town ' meeting had not the Litchfield town | meeting and other like town meetings |

THE HARTFORD DAILY

fifteen United States Senators, fifty members of Congress, five members of the United States Cabinet, ten govern- ors of states, forty-four judges : of

i state and inferior United States courts, and several foreign ministers. Gevrgia is especially well represented. Among

the names of judges of that state we notice Hugenius A. Nisbet, who wrote the elegant dissertation in Mitchum v. state, 11 Ga. 615, on the privilege and duty of counsel in arguing a case to a jury, in connection with the proper lim- itations of the freedom of debate—an opinion copied alomst .verbatim in Tucker v.. Henniker, 41 N. H. 317, with an omission of quotation-marks so singular and flagrant as to have oc- casioned comment by the profession. In ithe catalogue are printed the pictures of Judges Reeve and. Gould and their,

Y

‘fictions that it fell into disrepute; the | celebrated Rules of Hilary Term were adopted in 1884, and we have since substituted very generally for the | technicalities of the common-law system what we term a piain. and concise statement of causes of action and of defenses, administering law and equity in one suit, and sometimes per- adventure evolving a judgment as 1n-

congruous as the one examined in Bennett v. Butterworth, 11 How. (U.

S.) 669, or exhibiting the chaos of plead- ings and proceedings tabulated by the

reporter in Randon vy. Toby, 11 How. as Re. a t

(U. §S.) 498. Speaking of the reformed

procedure, how many lawyers are

aware that the chief merit of the Code

system was recognized and recom- mended: for. adoption by the preceptor of Judge Reeve, founder of the Litch-

residences, and also the school build- ings. The catalogue also contains the| prefaces to earlier editions, and an ac- count of various matters of interest concerning the school and its facilities too long for insertion here. The course of instruction was.completed in four-, teen months, including two vacations of four weeks each, one in the spring, the other in the autumn. No student could enter for a shorter period than three months. The terms of instruction were (in 1828) $100 for the first year and $60 for the second, payable either in advance or at the end of the year.

In the library of the Law School at Yale University may be found several bound volumes of manuscript which apparently contain the entire lectures of Judge Reeve. They are in the hand- writing of his son, Aaron Burr Reeve. But marginal reference interlineatior.s in his own hand make it certain that these volumes have all been revised by Judge Reeve himself. The tradition

and effectual.

field Law Schoot? The first volume of Root’s Connecticut Reports was pub- lished in 1798. The reporter was Jesse Root, afterward as above stated. a judge of the Supreme Court, with whom Tapping Reeve had studied law in Hartford. We will close with a quo-| tation from the introduction to that} volume: “Are not the courts of chancery in this state borrowed from a foreign jurisdiction, which grew out of the ignorance and barbarism of the law-judges at a certain period in that country from whence borrowed? And would it.not be as safe for the people to invest the courts of law with the power of deciding all questions and of giving relief in all cases according to the rules established in chancery, as it is to trust those same judges as chan- cellors to do it? Those rules might be considered as a part of the law, and the remedy be made much more concise Further, would not this remedy great inconveniences and save! much expense to suitors, who are fre<'

6 paca el the colonies preparea the ‘is that they are the manuscripts which es Aaa which alone that child he used in his lectures during the last de st e. Litchfield.was the prin-' years that he taught. An inspection of Sa Rae 3 on the highway from these volumes shows that the course of ape i to the Hudson; and a depot instruction given. at the Litchfield Law r ral itary stores, a workshop, an? a’ School covered the entire body of the stead storehouse for theContinental law... They speak of the law generally «age Ail el there established during —in reference to the sources whence it eke i on. Many distinguished is derived, as customs and statutes, KOS ie were sent there, and with the rules for the application and Sidce i eae rena pervaded the interpretation of each, Then follow} ee ay era Washington was a fre- , Real Estate. Rights of Persons, Rights | { visitor, and so were other general: of Things, Contracts, Torts, Evidence.

quently turned round at law to seek a remedy in chancery, and as often turned round in chancery because they have an adequate remedy at law? These are serious evils and ought not to be permitted to exist in the jurisprudence of a country famed for liberty and | justice, and which can be remedied only by the interposition of the legislature.”

Pe Rog le ihe _ a |

officers of the American forces, inclid- | ing Lafayette, who, when he visited the |

Ee : )

+ ann ni

aie

I

|

WY |

We i | ( ey yy

Ay Le My

if ¢

AMERICA’S FIRST LAW SCHOOL. Litchfield, 1798.

United States in 1824, went to Litch-| field to renew old memories with some

of his former comrades in arms. The leaden statue of King George the Third | which stood on the Battery in New

York was conveyed to Litchfield, and in

an orchard in the rear of the Wolcott house it was melted into bullets for the patriot army. All through the struggle with the mother country Litchfield was a hotbed oz patriotism, and when the first law school in America commenced its reguiar systematic course of in- struction there in 1784, the ambitious village had: among its citizens numer- pus men of exceptional intelligence and culture. One.of them was Andrew Adams, who had been a member of the Continental Cengress and. wag after- ward a judge of the Supreme Court

Oliver Wolcott was there. He also had been a member of the Congree, had signed the Declaration of Independence, and: was afterward governor of the state. Ephraim Kirby, who a few years later pubtished the first volume of law reports ever published in America, Major Seymour, who had commanded 2 regiment at the surrender of Bur- royne; Benjamin Tallmadge, perhaps the most noted cavairy commander of the Revolution; Julius Deming, a very prominent and successful merchant and. financier, and many others of like character were residing in the town. Into this community in the year 1778 came Tapping Reeve, a young lawyer just admitted to the bar, to settle in the practiee of his profession. Born in Southold, Long Island, in 1744, the son of Rev. Abner Reeve, a Presbyterian clergyman, he was graduated at Prince- ton College in 1763, and was immediate- ly appointed teacher in a grammar school in connection with the college. In. that station and as a tutor in the eollége itself, he passed seven years. He ‘then came to Connecticut to study law, entering the office of Judge Root, who was then a practicing lawyer in Hartford, and some years later a judge of the Supreme Court, ‘From Hartford he came to Litchfield. He had just pre- viously married Sally Burr, daughter of President Burr of Princeton and sister of Aaron Burr. -Until the con- elusion of the Revolutionary War there was but very little civil business dons in the county at Litchfield, and Mr. Reeve betocok himself to giving in- struction .to young .gentlemen who ‘looked forward to the iegal profession for support and advancement when quieter times should’ come. This em- ployment tended greatly to enlarge and improve his stock of legal learning, and led the way for him to begin in 1784 a systematic course of instruction. in the law and to regular classes. The Law School dates from that year. It con- tinued in successful operation and with annual graduating classes until 1833. The catalogue contains the names of one thousand and fifteen young men who:-were prepared for the bar subse- quent to the year 1798, most of whom were admitted to the practice in the court at Litchfield. The list of students prior to-that date is imperfect, but there are known to have been at least two hundred and ten. More than two

thirds of the students registered from states other than connecticut. Maine sent. four, New Hampshire fifteen, Ver- mont twenty-seven, Massachusetts ninety-four, Rhode Island twenty-two,

New York one’ hundred and twenty- four, New Jersey eleven, Pennsylvania thirty, Delaware .eighteen, Maryland thirty-nine, Virginia twenty-one, North Carolina twenty, South Carolina forty- five, Georgia sixty-nine, Ohio four, Indiana, Mississippi and Tennessee each one, Kentucky nine, Alabama three. and Louisiana seven. There were four from the District of Columbia and one from Calcutta. The. greatest number who entered in any single year was fifty-four in 1813.

Opposite the name of each student the catalogue mentions the officers of distinction held by him in after-years. In that particular the compilers of the eatalogue have made careful inquiry, and the writer has been told by mem- bers of the bar and of the judiciary in several of the states that the infor- mation is accurate and practically com- plete. Lawyers now living in the original states will recognize the names of many men conspicuous in the jurid- ical annals of their.state. Aaron Burr studied law at Litchfield..John C. Cal- houn entered the Law School in 180d; only a few’ rods from the school buila- ing. was the. house-~- where’ Harriet Beecher Stowe was born in-181l, and Henry Ward Beecher in 1818; and a short hour’s walk would have brought the young Southerner to the spot where John Brown was born in 1800, in the adjoining town of Torrington. Two of the graduates became judges of the Supreme Court of the United States-— Henry Baidwin and Levi Woodbury;

| justice. Hw died in 1823, in the eightieth

Pleading, Crimes and Bquity. <Ansl each of these general subjects is treated ef under various subsidiary topics, so as to make the matter intelligible and afford the student a correct and ade- quate idea of and basis for the work he will be called upon to perform in the’ practice of his profession. Judge Reeve | conducted the school alone until 179%. when, having been elected a judge cf the Supreme Court, he associated James Gould with him. They had the joint care of the school until 1820, when Judge Reeve withdrew. Mr. Gould continued the classes until 1833. being assisted during the least year by Jabez W. Huntington. Judge Reeve remained on the bench until he reached the limit of seventy years in 1815. The last part of the term he was chiet

yeur of his life. He left an only child, Aaron Burr, who graduated at Yale in 1802, Aaron Burr Reeve married Anna- belle Sheddon of Richmond, Va., in 1808. He died in 1809. He left an only child, Tapping Burr Reeve, who graduated at Yale, but died unmarried in 1829, and thus the family became extinct. Mr. Gould became a judge of the Supreme Court of Connecticut, and was the author of the celebrated work on Pleading. He died at Litchfield in 18338. The course of intsruction at the school must have been incomparably more exhaustive than would be possible at the present day, for the obvious reason that there was so much less to learn. In 1784 there were no printed reports of decisions of any court in the United States. Substantially the entire body of the law was to be found in the English reports. It is said that Judge Gould had systematically digested for his students “every ancient and modern opinion, whether overruled, doubted, or in any way qualified.” But vast bodies of law of which. the modern student must learn something were unknown to the curriculum of the Litchfield Law School, and many principles latent in the common law were just beginning to be developed. Lord Mansfield resigned his office of Chief Justice in June, 1788, after presiding in the King’s Bench over thirty years. Prior to his time the greatest uncertainty had prevailed on questions of commercial law. ‘‘Mer- eantile questions were so ignorantly treated when they came into Westmin- ster Hall,’ says Lord Campbell in his Lives of the Chief Justices, ‘that they were usually settled by private arbi- tration among the merchants them- selves.” There were no treatises on the subject and few cases in the books of reports. . Thus in Helyn v. ‘Adamson 8 Burr. 669, decided in 1758, it was first distinctly ruled that the second in- dorser of an inland bill of exchange was entitled to recover from the prior indorser upon failure of payment by the drawee, without making any demand on or inquiry after the drawer. In 1770 it was held that the indorser of a bill of exchange is discharged if he receives no notice of a refusal to accept by the drawee. (Blegard v. Hirst, 5 Burr. 2670.) And not: until 1786, in Tindal v. Brown, 1. Term. Rep. 167, was it finally determined that what..is reasonable notice to an indorser of non-payment by the maker of a promissory note, or acceptor. of a_ bill of exchange, is a question of law and not of ‘fact. OF course there was no American consti- tutional law when the school was founded, though some ofthe states had already adopted constitutions. The first pook on corporation law was that on Kyd, published in London in 1793, but it was chiefly made up of authorities and precedents relating to municipal corporations; and Willcock on Cor- porations, also an English treatise, was still more limited in its plan. ‘There was no American text-book on cor- porations until the first edition of Angell and. Ames was published in 1831. At that.time the need of such a book had become very urgent, but in the early years of the Litchfield Law School there must have been extreme- ly few private business corporations in this country. Not until. Louisville, etc., R. Co, v. Letson, 2 How. CED 497, decided in 1844, did corporations

De SS SS ee

become competent to sue and be sued}

as “citizens” of a state, regardless of the citizenship of the corporators A “fellow servant’ was a total stranger in legal nomenclature: Priestly v. Fowler, 3 M. & W. 1, was decided in 1837; Murray v. Railroad Co., 1 Mc- Mull, (S. Car.) 385, in 1841; and Farwell v. Railroad Co., 4 Met. (Mass.) 49, in 1842. The term ‘contributory negli- gence’ had not been coined: field v. Forrester, 11 East 60, was de- cided in 1809; Davies v. Mann, 10 M. & W. 546, in 1842, and the phrase is not used in either case. Civil actions for damages fér-death by wrongfulact were not maintainable. The law of insur- ance was virtually ‘the creation Lord Mansfield, but the volume of in-

-@ ues

surance law was comparatively insig- , On th;

nificant for several decades. other hand, there was an abundance of real-estate law and of law concerning executors and. administrators and trustees generally. In those days the executor de son tort was more in evi- dence than at present, although even now he has so much vitality in some jurisdictions that it weuld not be wise for the practitior’er to characterize him as Judge Lumpkin did in Shotwell vy. Rowell, 30 Ga. 559, “de son fiddle- stick!”? and cry. “Away with him!” The principles of equity jurisprudence had secured a firm footing, and at this day they are admirtistered in the Federal courts as they were expounded in tae i High Court of Chancery in HEnglard when the Constitution was adopted in 1789. Judge Gould was a master of the common-law system of pleading. which was extolled by some of its eulogists as the perfection of human reason. Dur- ing the period of the Law School the ‘noble science. of pleading became burdened with so many refinements and

Butter-.|

4s

FEBRUARY 1901.

SOUTH WANCHESTE

Purnell--Medical Ex- ;

; -f ;

AY,

an gene =

“LOCAL STUCK MARKET,

Morning, February 6, New York, New Haven & Hartford has ranged this week between 211% and 212% ‘ana there has been a transaction in the : __. New Haven Convertible bonds at 19842

| terday after a heart

; f ..,/ The price of Adams Express | failure and pneumonia. She ill | somewhat erratic: it has sold at the prices } with grip two weeks ago, but and in the order given, 155, 162 and 156. | take to her bed until a week ago. The inquiry for local stocks for invest- | physician, Dr. Moore, was called, ment is greater than the supply, and jit ihe soon found the will be “ved the of fire insur- }death of Mrs. Purnell are the part higher spread regret in the community. bint ovaeh a } egy ee We append usual schedule of the {had a large of friends and PI ; Bic 3B int who held her in high es | Jatest prices bid and asked by professional Brae. ntances rs) d her in g 1a Pea Be Wa : dealers in stocks:- | tee She was the widow of Samuel | : ' State boroanll who practica founded the | at | part of the town which is now the heart | . cnn Pinte : + : PCAaL of the business section. Mr. Purnell) Fart w | died four years ago, and since then his | Hart. Res, Red, Selvi had control of considerable prop- | City

Ps City ¢€ ronsvl. Water Yap., Ref'd

erty in the business center, ‘including | Cay

t the Park building, City

Pundiog. Ss

the Orford Inn, the | bees Bi finn ee e o

| Orford Annex, and several tenements. 7 fade Untax., Consol,

| Mr. Wells of Hartford, administrator 01 | « City

tthe estate, and F. W. Mills of this} » City,

| place, look ced after the management :

ithe property

Thursday i301.

| Death of Mrs. aminer Parker lll—Other News. Mrs. Elizabeth M. Purnell died yes- iliness

brief of was did not Her | and | The wide- } ance

She} last

; obser prices

for

case

hopeless.

causes most

the

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$23. csae on

Os 191. 4%192

1934. and Miscellancous Bonds. omepery Express Co. 4%, 1948....105

O14,

Sewer, Sch. Br.

for Mrs. Purnell, The} City Police,

| deceased was 43 years old. Prior to her/| Arsenal School

| marri she was Miss Elizabeth Fin- ; Boci.ad Doren. Fi Purely

liay and always lived in South Man-| “25 rtford Roa

| oh ester. Her husband was a resident! Railroad

ef Hartford, and after her marriage

| she lived there four years. Mr. and! american Thread Co., ist 4%8

| Mrs. Purnell moved to South Manches- ) DTG ers RP UR Rn A Mee cat $2

+ ter over twenty years ago. The de-{ Conn. Wes stern R.R. (old Conv.) :

| ceased leaves four children, Helen. Dor-} | 7%, 1900...

| othy, Elsie and Catherine the oldest 11} ja Cc. W.

iand the youngest 4 years, also three}

i brothers, George W. Finlay book-| :

lkeeper at Cheney Brothers’ office, | Hart.

| James and William Finlay, printers tn |

| Hartford. Mrs. Purnell was a member |

| of the Center Congregational Church

and in her church work her sterling}

character and refined nature won her | go

| many friends. The funeral will be held} Ha

Saturday. Services at her late home

fwill be conducted by Rev. George WwW. -

bi ewn olds a! : vill be in}

ase

>

25

aes Pow. 5%, 1901 mg & u 1924.... 2y7.1st mts. sold Y. Trans. Co., eb BZ,

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1930. ..105 . 102

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& Cc 0., } Int. Sil. Co. at 10% 1948 i Me ri. Sou. & | New c

1903 5 . ¥.

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fede iy & H. deb, rrington Co. ist 5% g, . Bnvel, Co, 1st 5% zg, os, 409

road and Street R & Conn. Vest. R. -, Man. & Roek. Ty. ord Street R. Rh. Cc pin hatt St. J H. & H, R. 2116 Banks and Trust Companies. Aetna National Bank.... 183 Americ: an. Nat. Bank (par 60).... 70 *harter Oak National Bank.... 93 itv Bank i onn, River Bank Co, Conn ecticut Trus oP rmers’ & Mech’'s lity Co. ry Ae | First National Bahk.. Pee be 'Hartford National Bank..........1: Hartford Trust Co.. } | Nat. Ex Sank (par 60).. : i Phoenix National Bank....... | eae urity Co Nason Bank 5 mate States Ba nik.. Fd hisieG anes & oleae

U Tire Insurance Aetna Connecticut Fire ; Hfd Steam: Soiler, (par 6 sft | Hi irtford Fire National Fire |} Phoenix Fire ...

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and Iniemnity Ins. Ceiwiearaa:

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Miscellaneous, EXE press Ens ART RE ee ORE Rs 155 Am. Hos iery Ca.,) (pars Zo). <.6<akoe 2 | American Thread: Co... (nar 5).... i Am. Publishing Co., (par 255... 3illings & Spencer Co., (par 23 i Broad Broo« Co., (par 25) |! Burr Index Co., (par 25)... Case, Lockwot od ot By Ce. 3% | Collins i Corbin Cabinet

||P. & EF, Corbin

Adams

PR ss Ot Re (par 25).. | Bagle Lock Co. (par 26 | Bddy Elec, Mfe. Co., (par _| Farm. Riv. Pow. Co. (par i Hartford Carpet Co Hart. Electric Light Co Hartford Gas Co, (par 2 Hart. & N, Y. Trs. Co. | Hart. W. Wire M, Co. Holyoke Water Power | International Silver, ‘International Silver oe awe 40 i Johns-Pratt Co.. «+ 306 Landers, Frary EC lark (par 25) 42 | J. R. Montgomery Coa, iNew Eng. Cot. Yarn pfd.... National Machine Co.,(par 25). | Peck, Stowe & Wilcox, (par 25).' 28 | Plimpton Mfg | Pratt & ‘ady

(par 25). bi: Se com... i

297 -320

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20 120 100

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80 70

iv 25) 63

& ¢ Co . i Pratt & Whitney Co, Rock Mfg. Co. (par 5 }Rus’ll & Erwin Mfg i Smyth Mfg. Co. | Stanley Rule & Lev. | Stanley Works eer i Switt & Co .... : ‘Forrington Co., wes ele | Torrington Co.,. com. A (par 25) 27 ; Utica Cement Co,, (par 25)...,.. -j Linion Mie, Co.N.Brit.(par 25) | United States Env, Co | United States Env. Co., | Western Au. Mach. Scre » | Whitlock Coil Co...

pt (n ew)..

Co (par 66

Co. (par? 5).

25).

“pfd. (par. 25).

com...

OLD SAYBROOK, Sarah G. Granniss is spending ia few weeks in New York.

Mrs. Robert Chapman left yesterda: * a week’s visit in Hartford with her i sister, Mrs, C. L, McMurray.

Elbert H. Clark, assistant ter, ili at his home, and H, Chalker is supplying his

i Edmund C. Spencer the guest of her

ood.

Miss

postmas- Benjamin piace. is in sister,

is

;

AS Mrs. W first

to

the course given it n

of the

Association occurs Charles FEF. Under will read “The I

of be Improveme! i this evening, whe hill of New York vals.” Rev... Gurde Jt brook will ' gational Church vith Rev. dw Miss Mary thy aded work after {her absence + | had charge The tune of John FE. ; died Tuesday morning, the Fi Congr

; morrow atte rnoon

mts by Town

rT. wi

a | ail an ?

y

1

dd ach

ey of West-

First Congre-

in exchange

Bacon.

s, teacher of No, 3

has returned to

Week's illness. During

Miss Arrietta H, the room.

ds

in sr.

ner

0

e . ral

Bushnell, who |

rsi eRe

ution al at

Church o’e lock.

TAFFORD SPR RINGS.

who lives at the borough

neon tharged

‘ollins ) DLLINS,