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Index to advertisements. largest Circulation of all the vewelry Publications. The Connoisseur

PAGE 30. Oldest of all the Jewelry publications. 2sth year. page 45.

Copyright by The Jewelers’ Circular Pub. Co. 189 Broadway. New York. Entered at the Post Office in N. Y as second<lass matter

VOL. XXXI. NEW YORK, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6, 1895. NO. 14.

FINE DUPLICATION OK A YACHT

IN SILVER.

The handsomest piece of work, without doubt, ever turned out by the Meriden Britannia Co. is now on exhibition at the New York store of the company, 208 Fifth Ave. It is an exact copy of the yacht Defender. Everything about the model is metal, from the sea that curls away at the bow to the fine rope in the rigging.

The workmanship is among the finestand most skilful of its kind that has been seen in New York in many years. Every detail of the boat is carried out with ex- actness and skill.

The lines of the hull are preserved, as far as they may be seen above the water line, and the sail plan is exactly that of the big sloop, but in pro- portion, of course, to the hull of the min- iature boat.

The miniature craft rests on a base two by four feet.

This base is made to represent a “chop- py" sea, and the effect is quite re- markable. Around the base is a border of anchors and chains, set off by unique cornerpieces.

The hull of Defender

rests in the center of the silver sea, and seems to be sailing under great headway. The hull is of silver, the metal being the original color as it comes out, lacquered to preserve the white finish and leave the hull white just as the original appeared. The ength of the hull is 30 inches. The decks

are gold plated, and a guard rail of copper runs all the way around it. Upon the deck are seen all the hatches and all the equip- ment for sailing the boat, even to a minia- ture binnacle and compass. The steering apparatus is an exact counterpart of that

The sails are of silver and they are cut in that peculiar style noticed on Defender. The sails spread are as follows : Mainsail, working topsail, jib, jib staysail and jib topsail. The rigging is exactly the same as that on the original sloop.

The miniature was built from photo- graphs and a wooden model that was fur- nished by the Her- r e s h o ff s . It was constructed under the direction of Walter Wilkinson, and the men in the factory were over a month in build- ing it. The model as it stands is valued at about $1,000.

Spoons in a Museum.

THE DEFENDER IN SILVER. MERIDEM BRITANNIA CO.

on the big sloop and the wheels on it move very easily.

The mast and topmast measure 36 inches from the deck to the top, and the boom is 24 inches long. The mast, the boom, the gaff and the bowsprit are all gold plated, while the tackle and ropes are of silver.

AC O L LEC- TION of spoons has been be- queathed to the Boston Museum of Fine Arts by J. W. Paige, and has been placed on exhibition in the coin room. They are of silver, iron, brass and other metals, and of wood, glass, horn, shell, coral, bone, ivory, etc. All periods from the 16th century to the present day are represented, and all nationalities as well, comprising the German, French, English, Dutch, American, Italian, Danish, Persian, Polish, Russian, Scandinavian, Arabian, Finnish or Laplandish, Venetian, and Oriental countries, as Japan, India, etc.

2

THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR

Nov. 6 , 1895.

J

P0LL©«

1

Heigfht, J6X ins. Dial,4^ins. Width, 8^ ins. Eij^ht Day Gong Strike.

List Price - $22.50.

m

m

CHICAGO,

133 & t35 WABASH AVE .

LONDON,

23 FORE ST. E.C.

THE

ANSOJVIA CLOCK COMPANY,

11 CI.IFF STREET,

NEW YORK.

CABLE ADDRESS "AIMS ONIA': P. O. B O X 2 3 O 4.

Nov. 6, 1895

AND HOROLOGICAL REVIEW.

3

Our is A Guaranty of Quality.

TRftOE MARK ^ OUR SILVER IS 925/1000 FINE. I ^ TRADE MARK

Our Trilby Hearts are Trumps. Our Trilby Chains Sell Well for Lockets, Fans and Vinaigrettes.

Our 400 Patterns of Silver Articles are useful for Wedding and Birthday Gifts and Whist Prizes.

Our Hanicure Sets and ITahicure Goods are beautiful, of fine quality and low in price.

Our Toilet Sets of Brushes, Combs and Mirrors are fine.

Our Bracelets with Padlocks, Sterling Silver and Gold Plate sell well.

Our Lockets, Charms, Lace Pins, Hair Chain Mounts, Vest Chains, Link Buttons, Mount Hope Sleeve Buttons, Ear- rings, and everything we make is manufactured expressly for you to make some money on. If you fail to find our goods with your jobber write and we will give you the names of wholesale dealers who carry our goods.

No. 306. Desk Knife and Letter Opener.

FOSTER & BAILEY,

SILVERSMITHS,

100 Richmond Street, PROVIDENCE, R. I

New York Office, Samples Only

178 BROADWAY.

4

IHE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR

No'’. 6. [395.

Bear in mind

That WAITE, THRESHER COMPANY’S GOODS SELL.

ENOUGH SAID.

Regina Husic Boxes.

Having the general agency for the Regina Music Boxes, I am in a position to offer special inducements to dealers.

Remember that there is no Music Box on the market that can compare with the Regina in quality and volume of tone, and durability of construction.

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE TO

A. WOLFF, General Agt.,

LINCOLN BUILDING,

Cor. I4th Street and Union Square, W., N. Y.

Jules Jurgensen

OP COPENHAGEN.

The reputation these watches have maintained Fifty Years has never been equalled^ being madt on strictly scientific principles and no expense sparedto^ rive the Best results in mechanism and timekeeping qualities,

VOLK AGENTS.

fohtt llydc’s

No 99 MAIRCN U«NC.

- - EMMONS - - ASSOCIATED LAW OFFICES.

PORTl,A!V», SEATT1.E, TACOiWA*

Oreg-oii. Wa.Mli. WaMlt.

Foreign Business a Specialty.

AIKIN-LAMBERT JEWELRY CO..

IMPORTERS OF

DIAMONDS.

JOBBERS IN

Watches, Jewelry, Chains,

NOVELTIES, ETC.

Latest Designs. Lowest Prices.

NEW YORK.

AGENTS FOR

1 1 ROCKFORD

'watch CO,

Nov. 6, 1895.

and HOROLOGICAL REVIEW.

ii

GRAPE VINE.

) 5

rH E S E illus- trations show ,e Tea, Dessert id Table Spoons,

>essert and Table Forks and so the designs upon the back ^ f handles. f

Goods of this Pattern now ready for delivery.

This pattern cannot be made in light weights.

The minimum being 1 2 oz. for Tea Spoons.

18 oz. for Dessert Spoons, and Forks.

30 oz. for Table Spoons.

28 oz. for Table Forks.

A Full Line of Fancy Pieces in good weights

only, is made in both plain and enameled finish.

¥

.rw»«iMir'iz e H A CC MAKERS OF WARES IN STERLING SILVER.

lOMINICK & HArr, for the trade only.

Broidway and SeventeGiith Street, Union Square, N. Y.

MESTABLISHED 1821.

6

THE JEWELERS' CIRCULAR

Nov. 6, i8c,5.

OUR LATEST PATTERN

Cra?c /IRarR.

New York 226 Fifth Avenue. Chicago 109=111 Wabash Avenue.

San Francisco 120 sutter street.

R. Wallace & Sons M’F’Q Co.,

SILVERSMITHS.

Nov. 6. 1805.

AND HOROLOGICAL REVIEW.

7

In the same part of the museum with the Paige collection is displayed the fine collec- tion of spoons loaned by Miss Sarah M Spooner, of Philadelphia. In the collection of Miss Spooner there is about a score of magnificent modern enameled Russian spoons, some of which have engravings on the outside of the bowls, either with pictor- ial designs or arabesques of vines, birds, etc. There are numerous designs of Dutch and German origin, with figures of human beings, animals, ships, etc., at the end of the handles, besides the well known apostle spoons, without which no collection is com- plete.

Who Was the First Exporter of American Clocks to Europe?

S. Bryan Jerome, son of the famous clock manufacturer, Ex-Mayor Chauncey Jerome, of New Haven, Conn., who died years ago, writes to the New Haven Register as fol- lows :

The story published in your paper of the 7th inst., giving a brief outline of the career of Rocky Goodrich, who recently died at the New Haven Alms House, contained a modicum of fact with a large percentage of myth. It is true that he was a native of Rocky Hill, that he lived in Bristol and Plainville, also in his later years at New Haven. About 1850 he became interested in the clock business at Forestville, as a manufacturer, but he was not the first man to introduce American clocks to foreign parts, neither did he ever export clocks to Europe. If the matter is of any conse- quence, it is well enough to give a correct statement in regard to it. The late Chauncey Jerome, of New Haven, was the first exporter of American clocks to Europe, and to China. In the year 1842, he sent C. Jerome, Jr., and Epaphroditus Peck, of Bristol, to England and James Hazard and Marcus Dewitt Loomis, of Sufifield, to China to establish a trade in these markets.

It was about as difficult an undertaking to accomplish as it was for Napoleon to cross the Alps, but after years of effort, and the expenditure of many thousands of dol- lars he was successful, and laid the founda- tion for an immense foreign trade in clocks. “He shook the bush and later manufac- turers have reaped the benefit. Mr. Jerome purchased clocks of -Smith & Goodrich of Forestville, and of other manufacturers, and exported them with the goods made at his New Haven factory. At this time named (1842) Rocky Goodrich was a young fellow of 27 or 28 years of age, working at the Birge clock factory in Bristol. He was a jolly good fellow,” popular always and everywhere, attractive in appearance, a good story teller, much given to Mun- chausenisms. The plausible tales in regard to his former wealth, his enterprise and busi- ness experience in years long gone, told to the officials and the inmates of the Town House, no doubt gained for him among them, a glamour and a prominence im- mensely enjoyed by him, but somewhat unusual amid such surroundings.

S. B. Jerome.

An Interesting and Important Customs Question.

Washington, D. C., Oct. 30. A question of importance has arisen in the Treasury Department under section 6 of the tariff act of 1894, which provides that no article 'of imported merchandise which shall copy or simulate the name or trademark of any domestic manufacture or manufacturer shall be admitted to entry at any custom house of the United States. And in order to aid the officers of the customs in enforcing this prohibition, any domestic manufacturer who has adopted trademarks, may require his name and residence and a description of his trademarks to be recorded in books which shall be kept for that purpose in the Department of the Treasury, under such regulations as the Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe, and may furnish to the Department facsimiles of such trademarks; and thereupon the Secretary of the Treas- ury shall cause one or more copies of the same to be transmitted to each collector or other proper officer of the customs.”

Some weeks ago the Ilgen Watch Com- pany ” filed their trademark ui der the provisions of the above section, and three days later the “Elgin Watch Company” filed a protest against allowing the first named company to register their trade- mark, on the ground that the trademark, “Ilgen Watch Company,” is a simulation of that of the Elgin Watch Company,” and therefore is contrary to law. No action has yet been taken on the subject, but it seems probable that the matter will be sent to the courts for determination.

The Wind up of the Rickenbacherjewelry Robbery.

Washington, D. C., Oct. 30. James Ray. a saloon keeper, has been found guilty of receiving stolen property. On July iith last Williams, alias Blood” Jones, a no- torious local colored crook, robbed the jew- elry store of Dominick Rickenbacher, G St., between 12th and 13th Sts., of a tray containing 19 gold watches. According to the testimony of Jones, he having some time ago pleaded guilty to the charge, the robbery was committed about noon. From the store, he said, he went at once to Ray’s

saloon, and sold two of the watches to Ray for $5. With the money he went to Balti- more, where he met one Poindexter, colored.

From Baltimore the pair expressed the remaining watches to New York, where Poindexter was arrested when he called for them. Subsequently he was turned over to the Baltimore authorities, who sent him to the penitentiary for three years, for dis- posing of stolen property. Later Jones re turned to Washington, surrendered himself, and has been in jail since. Ray was ad- mitted to bail in the sum of $2,000 and was released to await sentence. The penalty provided for the offence is imprisonment in the penitentiary for not less than one nor more than three years.

Important Sale of jewelry to Take Place.

Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 31. On Nov. 19, a sale of the magnificent collection of jewels, the property of Mrs. Sarah A. Smith, of this city, will take place in New York. The collection is valued at $300,000. The largest piece is a corsage ornament containing about a hundred small diamonds, and six of larger size. It is said to have cost $50,000. There is a pair of remarkable pigeon ’s blood ruby earrings, set with diamonds. The rubies weigh between ii and 12 karats, and are surrounded by 16 white brilliants, weigh- ing 18 karats. The value is estimated at $25,000. A brown diamond weighs seven karats. A table-cut diamond, under which is a portrait, weighs 44*/^ karats, and is surrounded by 20 white brilliants, weighing 15 karats. A pair of large emeralds, in ear- rings, weigh 14 karats. The weight of the sapphires in another pair of earrings is 17 karats. Still another pair of sapphire ear- rings weigh 14 karats. Two solitaire dia- mond rings weigh respectively eleven and seven karats.

There are over a hundred pieces of jew- elry, the more notable of which are a bow- knot brooch, with large and small dia- monds ; a bar pin and earrings, composed of sapphires and diamonds, and a massive pair of dull gold bracelets, made from Hungarian coin and of Hungarian manu- facture. There are a number of finger rings of turquoise, emerald, black and white pearls, sapphire, and diamond, all of extraordinary size and quality.

Id JOHN S’ NEWYORK’

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Nriv. 6. 1805.

No 80. Fine Nickel Movement, 17 Ruby Jewels in Gold settings, Safety Pinion, Hardened and Tempered Breguet Hair- Spring, Compensation Balance, Adjusted to heat, cold and positions; Patent Regu- lator, Double Sunk Dial.

No. 58. Nickel, ii Jewels, “afety Pinion, Compensation Balance, Top Plate Jeweled in Settings.

No. 40. Fine Nickel Movement, 17 Ruby Jewels in Gold settings. Safety Pinion, Hardened and Tempered Breguet Hair- Spring, Compensation Balance. Adjusted to heat, cold and positions. Patent Regu- lator, Double Sunk Dial.

No. 53. Nickel Movement. 15 Jewels in Gold settings, Safetv Pinion, Hardened and Tempered Breguet Hair-Spring,Compen- sation. Balance Patent Regulator, Double Sunk Dial.

No. 60. First Q u al ity N i c k e 1 M o V e - ment. 17 Ruby Jewels in Gold set- tings. Safety P i n i on, C ompen- s a t i o n B alance, H a rden-

ed and Tempered Breguet Hair-Spring, Fully Adjustrf, Double Sunk Dial.

THE PRESIDENT

THE PEERLESS RAILROAD WATCH

18 Size, Double Roller Escapement, 17 Jewels, Lever Setting, Matheson’s Patent Regulator, Fully Adjusted, and Finely Finished in all its Parts.

United States Watch Co., Waltham, Mass.

New York Office, Chicago Office,

46 Maiden Lane. Venetian Building.

To the Watch Jobber tsB Retailer

We invite your examination of the merits of I'NI'l'Kl> ST.A'I'KS ICVrs, their design, finish and time-keeping

qualities. These movements have, on merit alone, won a firm place, their sale having steadily increased each year since 1883, until even in these times of slow trade, steps are being taken to materially increase our factory at Waltham. Mass., U- S. A. How has this been achieved ? Simply by building a watch on honor, a watch that makes good the warranty of the Retailer, by its accurate performance in the pockets of the consumer. How can watches made by the cart- load, as it were, where machinery is expected to do the work of man’s brain, reasonably be expected to epitomize essential results Recog- nizing as just the criticism that too much labor saving machinery is a greater evil than too little, we have studiously observed the line where the use of machinery properly ends and human judgment and responsibility begins. As a consequence UXITED STA'I'llsi WA l’CtlES embody all the advantages derived from the employ- ment of the most modern automatic devices, supplemented by the supervision and labor of the most skilled and conscientious working people Result—" The best watch, grade for grade, on the market.” Our movements comprise complete lines of 18 Size and Open Face and H and 16 Size lliiniing^ in all grades from 7 to 17 Jewels, both Nickel and Gilded.

Our Spec al Itailroad Vl<»venieiit. 'I'lie Pr€‘»idenl,"

has already taken rank at the forefront of Perfecily KeliRble 'I'iniepieceR. No movement on the market excells it in finish of all its parts ; it is made for r>ine, not merely to catch the eye, yet it se- cures both.

New lb' Size Thin Model Now Ready for Delivery.

OUR FACTORY AT WALTHAM, MASS., IS THE BEST EQUIPPED AND MOST MODERN WATCH MANU- FACTURING PLANT IN AMERICA.

No. 63. Gilded, it Jewels in Gold Settings, Safety Pinion, Compen- sation Balance, Sunk Second Dial.

No. 69. Nickeled, Damaskeened 7 Jewels, Safety Pinion, Compen- sation Balance.

No. 79. First Quality Nickel Movement, 17 Ruby Jewels in Gold Settings, Safety Pinion, Hardened and Tempered Breguet Hair-Spring.Compensation Balance, Ad- justed to Heat, t old. Positions and Isochronism. Patent Regulator. Double Sunk Dial. This movement is specially adapted fur Railway Servic**.

No. 57. Gilded, 15 Jewels in settings. Safety Pinion. Compensation Balance, Plain Regulator, Hardened and Tem- pered Hair Spring.

No. 52. Fine Nickel Movement, 17 Jewels in Gold settings. Double Roller Escape- ment, Nickel Train Wheels, Safety Pinion, Hardened and Tempered Bre- guet Hair-Spring, Compensation Bal- ance. Adjusted. Patent Regulator, Double Sunk Dial.

No. 104. 16 Size. Nickel. 17 Jewels (5 pairs in settingsi, Breguet Hair-Spring, Mi- crometer Regulator, Double Sunk Dial.

No. 64. Nickel, II Jewels, Safety Pinion, Compen- sation Balance. Top Plate Teweled in settings.

Nov. 6, 1895.

AND HOROLOGICAL REVIEW.

9

The Suit of Stein & Ellbogen Co. vs. W. H.

Thompson.

Des Moines, la., Oct. 31. Prior to June i 1891, W. H. Thompson was the owner of a stock of jewelry in Cedar Rapids. On that day he borrowed of the City National Bank $1,000 for which he gave a note with surety, and Thompson at the same time made to plaintiff a mortgage on the stock of jewelry to indemnify him against loss. This mortgage was not placed on record until May 5, 1893. The note to the bank was, from time to time, renewed, with plaintiff as surety, the mortgage re- maining for his protection.

While the mortgage was so held, and before it was placed on record, Stein & Ellbogen Co., Chicago, without knowledge of the mortgage, sold to Thompson goods on credit, for which, about May 5, 1893, there was a balance due of $169.28. On May 9, 1893, by a written bill of sale, Thompson as- signed to the bank his entire stock of goods for the averred consideration of hav- ing paid the bank note and assumed the payment of some $780 of rent secured by a landlord’s lien on the stock of goods. About May 20, 1893, Stein & Ellbogen Co. commenced a suit, aided by attachment, and seized the stock of goods through the defendant sheriff. Their action was to recover the possession or value of the goods by the plaintiff as owner under his pur- chase.

The defendant answered, setting up the

fact as to the mortgage and its being with- held from record; the extending of credit without knowledge of the mortgagee, aver- ring the transaction to have been fraudu- lent, and that if a sale was made the con- sideration therefor was the same as that for the mortgage, and that the bill of sale was made in payment of or in lieu of the chattel mortgage, and with the intent to hinder and delay the creditors of Thomp- son. Issues were tried to a jury that re- turned a verdict for defendant, and the plaintiff appealed.

The Supreme Court now affirms the de- cision of the District Court.

Death of Joseph Charles Whitehouse.

Joseph Charles Whitehouse. who since his arrival in America, from Birmingham, England, nearly 30 years ago, has been con- nected with Tiffany & Co., New York, died on Wednesday evening last, after an illness extending over 10 months. Deceased was born in Handsworth, Staffordshire, England, Dec. 13, 1838. He learned the watchmak- ing trade with Wood & Son, the well-known old Birmingham firm of watchmakers, and soon became very proficient in his craft. At the age of 27 years he came to this country, and immediately accepted an en- gagement with Tiffany & Co., whose estab- lishment at that time, 1866, was located at 550-552 Broadway. His position at Tiffany’s brought him in touch with most of the

patrons of the house of the last quarter century, among whom his amiability was as warmly appreciated as it was among his late associates in business.

Mr. Whitehouse was a man of diversified interests. Robust himself, he was a lover of all athletic sports, and his sunny, poetic temperament frequently found expression in verses contributed to the daily and periodical press. The day after Christmas last year, he caught cold ; an attack of grip followed ; and after many months’ suffering, leakage of the heart and other complications set in, which terminated fatally on Wednesday evening.

The deceased was a brother of James H. Whitehouse, the well-known artist of Tiffany & Co. He leaves a wife and one daughter. The funeral services were held at his late residence, 631 Lafayette Ave., Brooklyn, Friday evening. The interment at Greenwood Cemetery on Saturday was private.

Furnishing Silver Plated Ware to The New York Navy Yard.

Washington, D. C., Oct. 31. Bids were opened at the Bureau of Supplies and Ac- counts, Navy Department, Oct. 29th, for furnishing the New York Navy Yard with plated ware. The bidders were as follows : Gorham Mfg. Co., New York, $620.88; Wilcox Silver Plate Co., Meriden, Conn., $572 81; Manhattan Supply Co., New York, $546.84.

Leon J. Qlaenzer & Co.,

80 & 82 Chambers

Clocks and Regulators, Bronzes,

Lamps and Globes, Fine

Austrian

Glassware, Fine Teplitz Vases,

New York*

Onyx Pedestals,

Fine Porcelains, Delft Pottery,

Bric-a-Brac, Sevres Goods,

Cabinets, Etc.

FALL NOVELTIES.

0

THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR

Nov. 6. 1895.

“(lABOON” “KONGO” “NASSAU”

USED EXCLUSIVELY IN OUR PRODUCTIONS.

MANUrAGTURERS

Nov. 6, 1895. AND HORQLOGICAL REVIEW.

DETT SCH BROS. 7 E. 17th ST., N.

#Our productions for the present sea= son embrace many articles original in conception, unique in design, and exclu= sive in the character of the Leather and the Silver ornamentations.

[[uiEii tim

12

TUC irwrlHRS’ circular

Nov. 6, 18^5.

SEND BUSINESS CARD

FOR OUR

Jewelry and Silver Fashions oF the Fall Season.

New Illustrated

REDUCED FAC-SIMILE OF COVER.

Catalogue and Price List

OF

Intercliangealile Cyliniler Musical Boxes

JUST ISSUED.

JACOT & SON,

39 UNION SQUARE. NEW YORK.

A LADY'S RAMBLES AMONG THE JEWELERS.

Miniatures painted on ivory are hand- somely framed for standing about in boudoir and parlor.

*

Silver deposit on glass continues to find favor with a numerous class of patrons.

*

Chatelaine bags made of uncut velvet and mounted with silver, gilded and enameled, are decidedly elegant in appearance.

*

Hatpins grow in elaborateness. A round ball is one of the favorite conceits in this- line.

*

Watch chains of colored enamel are migrat- ing here from Paris.

*

A satisfactory and up-to-date finger ring: is the hoop with three or five stones.

•Si-

Beautiful effects are gained on some of the new silver pitchers and chocolate jugs, by the employment of etching.

*

A galvanic coating of silver appears on, articles of fine china for the toilet.

Diamond earrings with pearl drops are- included [among the new things of the season.

*

There is a demand for letter seals, whicb is’ supplied with gold and silver affairs- that add decorative effect to milady’s writing desk.

*

There is no attempt at disguising the employment of substitutes for real gems. There is every variety of repetition of prec- ious stones in popular priced imitations.

Among attractions for the boudoir |are Dresden china atomizers on silver mounts, and bearing the familiar miniature on their bowls.

*

Novelty at a comparatively modest cost is achieved in a score of captivating ways in jewelry that employs small olivines and brilliants.

c-

(O'j i auiiKTjS €2^

As the holiday season approaches, in- creased attention is given to toilet sets and fancy knick-knacks in French and Dresden china, and in crystal with rich gold deco- rations.

•»

Silver mounted morocco bags, in club style, vie with the cabin bag for the patron- age of globe trotters.

The cabin-bag is just now the swag- ger thing for travelers. It has a great capacity for holding things, and is brought out in all sizes and leathers. Many of these bags are mounted in silver and are fitted with compartments for holding silver mounted toilet articles.

Nov. 6, 1895.

AND HOROLOGICAL REVIEW.

13

WE CARRV A FULL LINE.

1 ^

HIS STYLE OF DECORATION HAS A MARVELOUS SUCCESS.

lal i al>^otfegy, -

Pro(i\ pei\ou/t\^ n\dl^eK5 at

riorence,Ba55ai\o ^Naples,

Comprisirv^ tfve\i/apes f^oVe^, Qii\oPi ,l/pbii\o , Isparvei-'Areibo M

FOR JEWELERS

WE DISPLAY THE LATEST STYLES IN POTTERY.

endless variety. Cloisonne Enamel Writing Sets Y V and Card Receivers.

BRONZES, Choice Selections.

■p\ O p? C pr XT Statuettes and Figures in Old Dresden, Vienna and Dresden Vases,

Dresden Central Draft and other Lamps, an Immense Assortment.

BAWO (So DOTTER,

Importers, Manufacturers and Commission Merchants,

26, 28, 30 and 32 Barclay Street, p. o. box is72. NEW YORK.

OUR MOTTO : QUALITY AND PRICE SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS.

14

THb JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR

Nov. 6, 1895.

Since the Duchess of York set the fash- ion, the bracelet has become a favorite be- trothal gift among Anglomaniacs.

*

A style of chasing quite distinctive from the conventional repousse decoration, is represented in a new toilet ware pattern.

*

As the hair creeps down into the nape of the neck, there comes into use a narrow ban- deaux with feathery aigrettes that rise from the forehead and obviate the flat appear* ance of the crown.

*

Special pieces in silver, such as loving cups and vases, are rendered specially at- tractive this season with a decoration that employs different colored gilding, enamels, jewels and etching. These novelties must be seen to be appreciated.

Earrings are in again, not only the single stones but the long drops of our grand- mothers. These latter are being made abroad in emeralds, with diamond tops, often intermingled with pearls.

Elsie Bee.

Details of the Failure of Richards & Rutishauser.

Chicago, 111., Nov. i. Richards & Ru- tishauser, a catalogue and circular house, confessed judgment Oct. 25th, to Mary E. Rutishauser, mother of the junior partner, for $5,090 74. The day following an assign- ment was made. They had but small capital and were being carried by money furnished by Mrs. Rutishauser. The firm at one time did a local retail business, en- tering the catalogue business about five years ago.

An inventory of stock was completed Thursday but the result has not been an- nounced. It is thought the assets will be about $10,000; liabilities not known. It would seem that there is little for unsecured creditors. Light sales for some time past caused the failure.

The sheriff is in possession by virtue of a writ of execution in favor of Mrs. Rutis- hauser and sale is set for Nov. 4th, 10 o’clock A. M., at 601 Columbus building.

Palmiter & Smith have succeeded C. E. Palmiter, Watertown, N. Y. Fred Smith is a watchmaker, jeweler and diamond setter.

Capture of a New York Jewelry Thief in Colon.

A dispatch to New York from Colon, Colombia, dated Oct. 29th, stated that the United States Consul of that city had arrested Joseph Reiss, who arrived their from New York on board the Allianga. The arrest was made upon the authority of a telegram from the Police Department of New York, charging Reiss with grand larceny.

Reiss is wanted for stealing $i,goo worth of jewelry from L. S. Friedberger, 484 Broadway. Mr. Friedberger went to Police Headquarters on Oct. 21 and reported that Reiss had called on him the previous day and obtained $1,900 worth of watches, dia- monds and other articles of jewelry on memorandum. He was to return the jewelry or pay for it within an hour. He was not seen again and detectives discovered that he had sailed for Aspinwall and word was telegraphed to the United States Consul.

Rothstein & Lippman Bros., Bradford, Pa., opened their elegant new jewelry store on Nov. ist and 2d. They donated 10 per cent, of the sales of those two days to the Bradford hospital.

For Christmas ^ « Gorham Santa Claus Spoon

For sale by all the better class of Jewelers,

Too good for Dry Goods Stores Jewelers only.

Sterling Silver, ----- $1.00

Sterling Silver, Gilt bowl, - - 1.25

Sterling Silver. Gilt all over, 1.50

Never a question ot quality if this trade- mark is stamped on Silverware,

Gorham Manufacturing Company, Broadway and 19th street, Mew York.

The above is an imprint of an advertisement which is to appear in the DECEMBER

issues of the following publications :

DEMOREST’S,

CENTURY,

CHAUTAUQUAN,

LIPPINCOTT’S,

COSMOPOLITAN, McCLURE’S ST, NICHOLAS, MUNSEY’S,

ILLUSTRATED AMERICAN^ YOUTH’S COMPANION, LADIES’ HOME JOURNAL, SCRIBNER’S,

Which have a combined circulation of

3,058,000 Copies.

PRICES TO THE TRADE ON APPLICATION.

GORHAM MANUFACTURING COiTPANY,

SILVERSniTHS,

Broadway and Nineteenth St., New York City.

Nov. 6, 1895.

AND HOROLOGICAL REVIEW

15

A. WITTNAUER,

SUCCESSOR TO J. EUGENE ROBERT & CO.

IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER OF WATCHES.

19 HAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK.

EXTENSIVE LINES IN

New and attractive designs of small size watches at

various prices.

Enameled in all suitable colors, with and without handsome diamond or pearl decorations.

ACTUAL SIZE.

WotGlunan's Irapioued Time Detector

12 and 24 Different Keys with Safety Lock Attachments.

l^.S. Patents 1875-6 and 7. Reissued, 1880 This Watchman’s Time Detector con- tains all latest im provements. The only perfect instru- ment in the market. It cannot be tamp- ered with success- fully. Warranted in every way

Send for circular

E. IMHAUSER,

STERN BROS. & CO.,

CUTTERS AND

IRPORTEKS OF

DWnONDS.

CUTTING WORKS: 29 to 43 Gold St.

LONDON OFFICE: 29 Ely Place.

Cor. John and Nassau Sts. NEW YORK.

r\ELI5HEK &r FETTER.

128 Maiden Lane, New York.

MANUFACTURERS OF

WALL AND COUNTER CASES,

FOR JEWELRY, SILVER- WARE, ETC.

WE make to order only, and guarantee our work to be Dust Proof and First-Class in all its details, and to have all the Latest Improvements as regards Shelf Artrtngements, Electric Lights, Etc. We will cheerfully furnish Estimates and Sketches for any store free of charge.

CALL AND GEE US.

OUR NEW CATALOGUE

HANDSOMELY ILLUSTRATED, SHOWING 300 NEW PATTERNS OF

6313

SOLID GOLD, GOLD FILLED SILVER CASES.

WILL BE

SENT FREE

TO ANY LEGITIMATE . JEWELER.

b uO

COURVOISIER, WILCOX MFQ. CO.,

21 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK.

16

THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR

Nov. 6, 1895.

KfflDT FOR T6UR inSFECTIQn !l

. . THE LINE OF - -

Art Furniture

AND

Hall Clock Cases.

especially adapted for the

JEWELRY and art TRADES.

MANUFACTURED BY

Geo. W. Smith & Co.,

MAKERS OF

ART FURNITURE.

Factory: ^907-iq POWELTON AVE.,

PHILADELPHIA, PA.

NEW YORK OFFICE 818 BROADWAY,

AND H. P. VOLLMER,

SALESROOMS. Manager.

THE QUESTION V

WILL IT TARNISH Need not De asked if your Tissue Paper bears this 'abel.

MANUFACTURED BY

C. H. Dexter Sons,

W/NDSOR LOCKS, CONN.

< BE SURE YOU GET THIS BRAND I>

It has been adopted and is now used by the leading manufacturers of this country.

AIKLIINT, CO.,

"x^7r"7s“ o"® Fine Gold Pens, = Holders, = Pencils, = Picks

AND NOVELTIES IN GOLD, SILVER AND PLATE.

Having increased ttie size of our factory we are prepared to make larger quantities of goods than ever. Every pen carefully tested and fully warranted.

CHICAGO BRANCH: 103 State Street, S. N. JENKINS, Manager.

GENERAL AGENTS FOR PAUL E. WIRT FOUNTAIN PENS.

19 Maiden Lane, New York.

AND HOROLOGICAL REVIEW.

i6-a

Nov. 6, 1895.

Trial of the Sensational Libel Case in Canada.

Toronto, Can., Oct. 31. The suit of the American Watch Case Co., Toronto, vs. W. F. Doll, for libel in which damages of $5,000 are claimed has been on trial this week at the Assize Court, before Judge Rose and a special jury of business men. The trial commenced on Monday. Wm. Lount, Q. C., and J. R. Roaf appeared as counsel for the plaintiffs and the defendant Doll conducted his own case. The case is one of long standing, the cause of action having originated in 1893. On the previous trial which lasted for eight days, the jury disagreed.

Mr. Lount in opening the case read ex- tracts to the jury from a pamphlet published by the defendant entitled Karats,” which he pointed out charged the company with putting upon the market goods represented to be of a quality superior to what they actually were. It was also part of the com- plaint that Doll petitioned Parliament to the effect that the manufactures of the company are similar in everything but quality to those of the American Waltham Watch Co., of Waltham, and that he dis- played statements reflecting on the plain- tiffs, together with specimens of their goods in a store window in the Ro sin House block. The placards containing these statements were exhibited in court.

W. F. McLean, M. P., and proprietor of the Toronto World testified that he had re- fused to publish some of Doll’s communica- tions on the ground that they might lay him open to a charge of libel.

T. W. Dyas, of the Mail, testified to the publication in that paper of police court proceedings when Mr. Doll had W. K. Mc- Naught, of the American Watch Case Co., up on a charge of false pretenses.

Edwin Pearson, insurance agent, swore ihat after the fire at the company ’s works, Doll warned him that he might be imposed ■on in the adjustment.

Mr. Doll said he was prepared to justify all the charges he had made.

W. K. McNaught, of the American Watch Case Co., was called and requested to read a number of articles from his paper, the Trader, with the object of showing that the company made certain representations as to the quality of their goods. A large number of watches were put in as exhibits. Mr. McNaught was subjected to a long and close examination by Mr. Doll, to show that the goods were not as represented, be- ing in the box all Tuesday. With regard to the J^Iohawk case he said on cross- e.xamination that it was a brass case gilded and sold for $2 So, which price he claimed should be sufficient to show to anyone that it was not gold.

G. R. Wellings, manufacturing jeweler, testified for the defence that he had assayed one of the plaintiffs’ watch cases stamped 14 karats. If it were melted all together, that is the springs, crown and center which are not solid gold, the case would assay about 7 karats.

Sells

SILVER PLATE AND DECORATED PORCELAIN BACK MIRROR AND BRUSH.

at sight

at retail for $5 for the set.

LEVY, DREYFUS & CO.,

Clocks, Art Bric=a-Brac and Novelties for Jewelers.

9 & II MAIDEN LANE, N. Y.

FOR WANT OF SPACE ALL OUR CUT CLASS WILL BE SOLD IN ASSORTMENTS OF $50 AND UPWARDS AT

VAKIETY SUFFICIENT TO SUIT ALL CLASSES OF TRADE.

COST.

A, J. HEDGES & CO.,